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Monday, May 17, 2010

Yikes

OK, I can see that the curb chain is supposed to be on the other side of the rings, opposite the mouthpiece. That being said, could anyone care to explain this contraption? This is an Icelandic bit, I know that much, but good heavens, it's weird looking.


19 comments:

  1. Other than being more "modern art" looking than most, this one looks just like most other medium shanked curbs. I'm guessing about 5" shanks from the width of the mouth. I've never been particularly fond of broken mouth shanked bits. As a driver, I do tend to like solid mouth shanked bits, but not of this length. This would be the equal of driving with a broken mouth liverpool on the 3rd slot. Otherwise known as the "damn I hope this beast stops" slot

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  2. it looks like most curb bits do? just some artistic designed shanks. the shanks are kinda long, but the mouth piece is smooth. not really a harsh bit, unless the rider just has horriable heavy hands (but any bit is harsh in those hands)

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  3. I REALLY like the look of this bit until I did a little bit of research (went to Yahoo and typed in "Islandic Horse Bit")...Wow some of those people are super harsh on their horses' mouths. I also read something that said they kinda grouped this bit with the same action as the Tom Thumbs...ick. I really do like how it looks because it's different, but I don't know if I'd try it knowing it acts like a TT bit.

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  4. I'm too old fashioned for that modern design.
    In the end, it's the rider not the bit that will determine if it's used correctly without discomfort.

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  5. Panavia- I've always read about the "evils" of Tom Thumb bits. How they're mostly the beginner bits that are usually used harshly (I've always seen them in the hands of children too). I have one simply because I saw everyone else using them, didn't have a horse, and had not read about how harsh they were. I like the concept of dogbone, French links, and 3-piece bits but I'm still learning. lol

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  6. When did IKEA start making bits??

    :P

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  7. It looks like a Tom Thumb designed by an art nouveau guy.

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  8. Cattypex, if it was from Ikea then some assembly would be required ;)

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  9. ...and it would be STACKABLE! ;)

    Why do so many gaited breeds use crazy bits?

    Is it because unskilled horsemen brace themselves against the horse's mouth to "set" their heads, and the horse then meets the resistance in some mad parody of collection?? Cuz, I mean, if the neck is bent, that means they're collected, right? *snort*

    I guess if they're bent backwards in the spine, they throw their front legs all over to compensate? That's what it looks like to me....

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  10. Funny thing, I always thought Tom Thumb meant mild because it meant short shanks. I used a mullen mouth pelham with a short shank on my welsh cob. (He went beautifully in it.) I purchased my tack from an English only catalog where they called the mullen mouth pelham a Tom Thumb. I didn't know about Tom Thumb's "evil twin" so to speak. The kindest bit hurts with a jerk is riding. Pun intended.

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  11. @cp: Is it because unskilled horsemen brace themselves against the horse's mouth to "set" their heads, and the horse then meets the resistance in some mad parody of collection?? Cuz, I mean, if the neck is bent, that means they're collected, right? *snort*

    I guess if they're bent backwards in the spine, they throw their front legs all over to compensate? That's what it looks like to me...."

    YEP. That's exactly it! Having come out of the gaited horse world where all gaited horses MUST be ridden in a shanked bit and they MUST wear shoes, that's exactly why they do it! Those shanks just keep getting longer and longer for more headset and reach. UGH.

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  12. Yeah. I've seen the photos of Icey's under tack and it's a little frightening.

    I'm not getting the comments about Tom Thumb's being harsh, tho. What am I missing here? One of my "giveaway's" came with tack and the bridle had one on it. Didn't seem all that horrible to me. I didn't *use* it, I just slapped a fat snaffle on him to start with. Remember, I ride hunters and I've probably never actually ridden a horse with a TT bit.

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  13. I gather the issue with TT bit is not the bit itself, but being used ineffectively at the wrong time in training or by a rider with bad hands. I don't have a problem with the bit in the photo, but we can all see where it would be used stupidly. Especially when I see photos of Icelands in a bit like that with a tight flash. Like this:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvk7MhR2Z2U
    I believe this topic has been well covered on this blog. There are plenty of Icey riders with soft hands and comfortable tack, but tightly wound tack and hyperflexion is giving the whole group a bad name. The horses are spirited but they are not unwilling.

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  14. I have an Icelandic mare and have been to my share of Icelandic shows and I have *NEVER* seen an Icelandic horse ridden/shown in anything but a snaffle.

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  15. i agree with Shortnstumpy. i have something of an Icey obsession and i have to say that in the majority of vids i've seen of Iceys being ridden, they're in a plain snaffle bridle. i also happen to live in an area where there are a lot of Iceys and they're also all ridden in snaffles.

    i know stereotypes exist for a reason, but i do get annoyed with people saying and assuming that *all* gaited horses are abused adn that everyone who rides gaited horses is a yahoo with no balance, sense, or training. it's every bit as ridiculous as people saying that everyone who rides "English" is a snob or all people who ride "western" ride like movie cowboys.

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  16. of course the cain is om the wrong side! accuallay this bit i designed to be totaly loose wen the horse is "on the bit" and only work as a level wen the horse is to high i its outline. of coure some bits are esier to make damage with. but using a to thick bit can also be painfull for the horse our old horse had a "carving"on the first molar where the thick bit had made a inprint in the teeth. 90 % of all ice rider use a bit who´s dubble linked ( three pices) and a remont nose band -if any and the swedish horse dentist ( vets/ human dentist)praise that.

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  17. I myself own an icelandic horse, and I have to say that I am sometimes ashamed of being an icelandic horse-person. There are many harsh riders who pull on their horses' mouths and don't even consider what pain they are inflicting on the horses. The nosebands that are traditionally used when riding icelandic horses (though never in combination with any kind of curb bit!) is often misunderstood, because so many use it to "strap" the horse's mouth shut, when it is supposed to be so loose that it will only take effect when (if) the horse opens it's mouth, with room for 4 fingers under the noseband. But, these "bad" riders come in many different sizes and shapes, and I must admit that I've seen some pretty nasty things from many different sides of the sport. Of course, there are also MANY riders who know what they are doing.

    The bit pictured above is a traditional icelandic horse curb bit. The chain is on the wrong side in the picture, and the chain is supposed to be quite loose (this is why it may look like it is being pulled very harshly, even though it's not... Of course, sometimes it is.). This is a strong bit, and it is not to be taken lightly. Way too many uneducated riders use this, and all it will do for them is cause their horse to use it's body wrong, and just flex it's neck, and nothing else. We usually say that it makes a good horse with a good rider better, but will make any horse worse with a bad rider, or if it's an ueducated horse.

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