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Friday, July 17, 2009

Two - For - One

A long time back, I did a post about these two seater saddles. I haven't seen any in awhile, and then I run across these.















From the way they are constructed, it looks like the smaller "front seat" goes on the actual saddle area of the horse. It has the front girth latigo and the rear latigo seems to be on the "back seat" area. So, that said, the person (presumably the larger person from the size) on the back would actually be riding on the horse's rump. Unless the horse looked like good ol' Khemosausage here...


(Breyer really did the grand old fellow a disservice with this model.)

9 comments:

  1. Khemosausage---HAHAHAHAHA! I actually considered one of these types of saddles at one time for giving kids rides. I decided against it because it's expensive to have this type of saddle for the few times I would have used it. I opted for the kiddie stirrups that buckle onto the horn instead. That first saddle is doozy and the color combination is putrid. I kind of like the second and fourth saddles, but I'm with you. Having the small part over the horse's girth and the large part in the back makes absolutely no sense. If I were to get one of these, I'd want the small seat in the back and the large seat in front.....That should have been a no brainer to the manufacturers if they knew anything about horses!

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  2. I am so terrified of these saddles. At least with a kid on your lap you are able to (don't laugh) throw them off if you have to. Or if you come off, the kid comes off with you.

    In this saddle, Timmy Toddler gets stuck alone on the freaking out horse while you're rolling around in the dust.

    If bicycle kid seats are dangerous, why aren't these? When will people understand that horses are more dangerous than bicycles?

    unionsquarestables.blogspot.com

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  3. Union Square,

    "At least with a kid on your lap you are able to (don't laugh) throw them off if you have to. Or if you come off, the kid comes off with you."

    Are you nuts? No, they don't always do that. I saw a mother and daughter riding like that in a saddle, and the horse tripped and fell forward. Mom came off, girl gripped the horn and didn't, and the horse trotted off and the kid had no control. They were able to catch the horse quickly, but the kid was screaming which was making the horse freak out and made things worse.

    I also realized that if mom hadn't come off, then with kid in front of her, she could have slid forward, crushing kid's pelvis.

    When it comes to people wanting to ride on the horse with their kid: seriously, folks, get the kid a pony. OR do something REALLY novel: get the kid riding lessons so he/she will learn how to control a horse him/herself!

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  4. People put kids on horses they have absolutely NO BUSINESS being on top of, with or without an adult. I would ONLY put a child on a horse that was not going to freak out if the kid started screaming or if something scary happened.

    I have a 20 year old appy mare that is about as close to "bombproof" as a horse can be, though I know NO horse can be completely bombproof.

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  5. Please stop by my blog, there's an award waiting for you!

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  6. Ack- the one with the little saddle in front would be insanely painful on the horse's withers, or would put the bigger rider over his loins.

    I suppose these would work on those long-backed (real) horses that everyone sees now and then, but typically those horses get swaybacked earlier, and jamming two people up there is not going to help.

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  7. The Khemosausage model isn't entirely Breyer's fault - turns out the clay prototype melted during shipping (along with the Rugged Lark one, by the same artist). In order to create the mold they ended up "fixing" the model, so you can only imagine how bad it must have looked before the final result!

    You can really see it on the Rugged Lark - his eyes don't line up at all, the poor guy looks like Frankenstein's horse.

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